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it scandalous, grover cleveland's best friend and law partner was a guy named oscar fulsome. cleveland was born in new jersey and he spent most of his career in buffalo. he was a very successful lawyer and he and oscar were partners. they practice law together and they went out together and they would go out drinking and being together and it appears they enjoyed the services of maria halpern and together so when maria halpern and gets pregnant she has a son and neither knew who the father was. maria complicates things by naming the child oscar cleveland oscar fulsome had been married and had a daughter, frances. wheatland was a bachelors of cleveland accepted the responsibility and put the child in an orphanage. here's the other part of the scandal. oscar fulsome dies a few years later in a carriage accident. he is thrown from an apparently breaks his neck. he leaves a widow and a young girl frances and globe -- rover leave and make some enormous amount of money and cleveland takes care of the widow and the young girl, pays for them and sets them up in a nice home, best friend and former law p
. jefferson himself said that the duty of a magistrate is to the line of the law, but it is not the highest duty. that the survival and success of the country is your highest obligation. one person's imperial president i is another person's hero. one person's tyranny is another person's brilliant reform. part of what we have to struggle with from age to age in america is realizing that some generations there's going to be an excess of power useed in a way -- used in a way in which we approve, and in some generations there's going to be an excess of power used in ways which we would fight to the death against. but that's the way history has unfolded. and jefferson was on the right side of that in the very beginning. i want to talk about three quick lessons that i think all of us can, particularly our second term, early second term president might be able to take from jefferson. one goes to louisiana which is you need to be daring. jefferson understood that the political clock wasn't like a normal clock, it moved faster. ing as the president's clock ticks even in a first term, everybody else
and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note and he talked jefferson into it and then six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters from monticello grill begin to get gloomy. -- really begin to get gloomy. >> i want to follow up -- >> we have a circulating microphone. >> all right. well, i want to follow-up on the kosciuszko will. of course after reading jim lewis' review yesterday when she called to book a train wreck, i thought maybe more to use this -- elaborate a little on the. you explain jefferson was made executor, and however, where i'm confused is that with 18 months of kosciuszko's death this will was contested by three different parties, in europe, one within the united states at the time, when that surface three different subsequent wills that had been drawn up in europe, and so i don't quite understand, and in jefferson -- at this point he said this is going to really fall into a lot of litigation. he
and the next election, jackson had gone around the country, building a popular majority in getting laws changed from state to state to state in which providing for universal white male suffrage, which took a vote out of the hands of property owners and give it to barbarians as john quincy adams may say. the bank if there was a deal with clay in 1824, was that ethical bystanders of those days and retrospectively by our standards? >> is certainly what is ethical in those days. he took a lot of flak for it, but the choice in his mind was to turn the country over to a barbarians who couldn't write his name, who had violated the constitution that will turn the word of 1812, con into massacre in the seminal sender and enduring whatever he felt like doing. he did not want to see this man president. >> one point in the book he described a bit of a crouch. teaching to afflict him as a person? >> yes. >> there is some time travel involved. >> all of us are brooches at times. he did not suffer fools, so you would be grouchy. i was grouchy last night when romney said we have fewer ships today than we had i
into law -- created the environmental protection agency. one of the first orders of business of the ecb the a was to ban a series of insecticides starting with ddt and including all of its cousins, many of which were more toxic than ddt. the domestic ban went into effect in 1972. began phasing them out and it is too bad carson didn't live to see that but she didn't and i like to think of her in this photograph taken by her friends the freeman family who lived next door to her in maine on the shoreline of southport island in 1955, of my favorite photographs of her. she looks very content in this picture and someone who was at home in that environment and at home in the world and at home in her role as an author, scientist and ultimately somebody who would change the way we think about things. that is a good place to stop and take any questions you have. >> anybody have any questions? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? >> why was the book called "silent spring"? that probably stems from the opening chapter in which she described a spring in which the birds are absent from the tow
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5